Research: Doctors, patients benefit when doctors apologize

By | Medical Malpractice

Administrators at hospitals and other medical facilities are always striving to improve patient satisfaction and reduce medical error. Still, mistakes persist throughout such facilities in Tennessee, leading to scores of medical malpractice suits every year. Surprising new research shows that medical malpractice claims could be resolved faster if physicians would simply apologize for their wrongdoing, allowing both the doctor and victim to move on from the incident. An administrator at the University of Michigan Health System has developed and implemented a novel idea that allows physicians to own up to their mistakes while still giving patients a voice. The administrator,…

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Misuse of Technology a Growing Problem for Medical Profession

By | Medical Malpractice

Recent technology has done wonders for the health care profession. Computers, smartphones and other devices have helped reduce medical errors by providing medical professionals with instant access to patient information, prescription details and case studies. But what happens when technology comes between a doctor and his or her patient? In the age of iPhones, Facebook and instant messaging, the potentially dangerous phenomenon called “distracted doctoring” has opened the door for medical malpractice lawsuits and is becoming a growing concern for the medical profession. Recent data suggests that the problem of distracted doctoring is even more widespread than researchers suspected. A…

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Survey Reveals Striking Frequency of Medical Mistakes

By | Medical Malpractice

A recent Wolters Kluwer Health survey found that nearly one in every three Americans say they or a family member or friend have been the victim of a medical mistake. In the survey, “medical mistake” is defined as being given incorrect treatment or the wrong medication or dosage. More than one in five respondents said that they have been misdiagnosed by their doctor, and 45 percent said that they have received an incorrect bill from their healthcare provider. Sadly, these statistics show that the standard of care being provided to patients is not nearly as good as it should be….

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Will Electronic Medical Records Reduce Malpractice Risks?

By | Medical Malpractice

In recent years, the federal government has pushed clinics and hospitals to adopt electronic medical records systems. Proponents argued that the systems would make medical practices more efficient and reduce the risk of doctor errors. Others, however, weren’t so sure. They worried that new electronic systems could lead to a whole slew of inadvertent mistakes. Thankfully, these fears are not coming true. In fact, a recent study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine showed that doctors who use electronic medical records are actually 84 percent less likely to be sued for medical malpractice than doctors who use traditional paper…

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In Tennessee Medical Malpractice, Admitting A Mistake is Just the Beginning

By | Medical Malpractice

Approximately 100 serious medical mistakes took place in middle Tennessee hospitals in the last three years. About one dozen of those were actually reported and the others are just an estimate, based on federal statistics, of the number of mistakes that did occur yet went unreported. A Memphis medical malpractice attorney usually does have to do a fair amount of investigating, digging into medical records when something goes wrong at a hospital, because very few health care professionals will come right out and admit mistakes. But, that culture of secrecy, usually intended to avoid malpractice lawsuits, may be changing. One…

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Acetaminophen (Tylenol) Leading Cause of Liver Failure in the U.S.

By | Dangerous & Defective Drugs

An advisory panel of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) suggested lowering the recommended and maximum daily doses of acetaminophen to 650 mg and approximately 2,600 mg, respectively. The lowered dosing is intended to protect consumers from unknowing overdose that may lead to liver complications or failure. Acetaminophen-containing drugs, like Percocet and Vicodin, are also on the chopping block. Both drugs are made up of a combination of hydrocodone or oxycodone and acetaminophen. The suspected problem with these types of pain killers is that many who take them are unaware that they also contain acetaminophen and they may take additional Tylenol or…

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More Hospitals Banning Cameras in Delivery Rooms

By | Medical Malpractice

Across the nation and in Tennessee, increasing numbers of hospitals are not allowing patients and their family members to take pictures or video in delivery rooms until the babies are safely delivered. Some hospitals even prohibit photography or video recording in the delivery room until the medical team has given its permission. Hospitals claim that these policy changes are intended to maintain the safety of mothers and babies as well as protect the identity of hospital workers who do not wish to become unintentional celebrities in videos or pictures posted on websites like YouTube and Facebook, reported the New York…

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