Tennessee car accidents: University president injured in crash

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Car accidents are tragic events that we never expect to happen. Fortunately, most traffic accidents do not cause serious injury or death. However, when Tennessee residents are injured seriously in car accidents, the aftereffects can be nothing short of life-changing — both for family members and the victims themselves.

Recently, the president of East Tennessee State University was hospitalized after being involved in an automobile crash. A university spokesman stated that the president currently remains in stable condition, and his full recovery is expected. The other individual who was in the accident, the 34-year-old driver of the other car, was also taken to the hospital to receive treatment for minor injuries.

According to police, the accident occurred at approximately 5 p.m., on Monday, Nov. 18. It was apparently caused when a flatbed wrecker truck smashed into the university president’s sport-utility vehicle. Police say that the wrecker truck failed to stop at a red light.

Both of the vehicles were severely damaged, and they had to be towed away from the accident scene. The driver of the wrecker truck was cited with failing to obey a traffic signal device and failing to have an updated driver’s license. Police indicated that no other charges are expected to be made.

It is good news that the president is recovering from his injuries. However, the cost of his medical care may represent a significant burden for himself and his family. Considering that the driver of the wrecker truck was faulted by law enforcement authorities in this Tennessee accident, the injured victim may elect to pursue a personal injury claim against that driver and any separate owner of the vehicle he was operating. Monetary damages for pain and suffering and for the cost of medical care and rehabilitation are typically sought in legal claims relating to car accidents like this one.

Source: TriCities.com, ETSU president injured in car accident, James Shea, Nov. 19, 2013